Singing Praises for Heirloom Seed Suppliers

January 22, 2009

A stream of heirloom vegetable seed catalogs has been arriving in my mailbox over the past few months and I’m all set to begin my annual seed catalog browsing fest.

I typically review what’s new and interesting from the veggie seed catalogs, or share the special heirloom varieties that will be finding their way into my garden for the first time during the upcoming season, but this year I thought I’d change up and provide a little information regarding some of my favorite heirloom seed companies.

heirloom seed catalogs2 Singing Praises for Heirloom Seed Suppliers

For the Love of Heirloom Vegetables and Antique Fruits!

If you’re wondering why I make such a big deal over heirloom seeds check out a few of my previous articles introducing many of the heirlooms that have caught my eye and inspired me in the past:

Yes I love heirloom seeds for the unique qualities and diversity that they bring to garden, and I couldn’t imagine what it would be like to be deprived of these priceless treasures.

The Precarious World of Open-Pollinated Seeds

I’m not the only gardener that is captivated by heirlooms or concerned by the unpleasant prospects of loosing even one of these cherished plants. Here are what a few others have shared about these extraordinary seeds, where they come from, and the importance of safeguarding and preserving them for future generations:

  • The Case for Heirloom Bulbs: Heirlooms aren’t exclusive to the vegetable gardening world; you’ll find them seducing flower enthusiasts as well.
  • Heirloom Gardening Defined: Patrick always offers an informative and interesting take on things pertaining to the state of seeds and “saving” them.
  • Seed Snobs United: Anyone stuck on the belief that hybrid vegetable seeds offer the backyard gardeners’ best opportunity for a successful harvest?
  • Roots of the Seed Industry: A lesson on the history of the commercial seed industry and some of the significant events that brought us to where we are today.
  • Simple Pleasures of Seed Saving: Christa shares her thoughts and some really cool photos regarding the significance of saving seeds in her backyard garden.
  • It’s a Seedy Business: Vanity Fair delves into the murky dealings that farmers are facing in those behind the scenes battles against the corporate seed giants.

Ready to add some excitement and variety/diversity to your own garden next season? Well consider adopting a few heirloom vegetables of your own, or take it a step further when you are ready by learning how to save your own seeds for old time’s sake.

Giving the Business to Heirloom Seed Growers

A recent inquiry from a visitor looking for a source to obtain Green Glaze Collard seeds made it clear that many gardeners are unaware of the dedicated seed suppliers that are devoted to distributing uncommon vegetable varieties to the home gardener. Over the next couple of weeks I’ll feature a number of articles about these intriguing heirloom seed companies and offer reviews of some of my favorites such as:

If you’ve never experienced the delights of heirloom vegetable gardening now’s the time to order a catalog and check out the “new” and interesting seed varieties that are perfect for the backyard gardener. Your support of these heirloom seed suppliers will help ensure that they are able to continue their missions of preserving these seeds from our past. These heirloom seed companies have my support and appreciation for the service they all provide!





Other Related Vegetable Gardening Posts:

{ 5 comments… read them below or add one }

Chiot's Run January 22, 2009 at 11:20 pm

OOOOO, thanks. I haven’t planned my garden yet and I want to do mostly heirlooms this year. I’ll be checking all of these out.

Thomas W. January 22, 2009 at 11:46 pm

I’m reading “Back Garden Seed Saving” by Sue Stickland. Good book, includes details about: Beetroot, spinach, beet, chard, broad bean, carrot, celery and celeriac, cucumber, French bean, leafy brassicas, leek, lettuce, melon, onion, parsnip, pea, pepper and chilli, radish, squash, marrows, pumpkins, courgettes, tomato, turnip and swede.

Kenny Point January 23, 2009 at 8:35 am

Susy, I think that you will really enjoy your adventure into raising the wide variety of heirloom veggies with their assortment of appearances, colors. and flavors!

Tom, that sounds like an interesting book; especially if it covers saving seeds and keeping them pure in the smaller setting of the backyard garden Thanks for the heads up!

Farmer John February 6, 2009 at 4:09 pm

What a great blog! I’m so glad to see someone other than us seed companies singing the praises of heirloom seeds!

paul May 16, 2010 at 2:37 pm

hello
i live in england but found a really good heirloom site in germany, very reasonable prices too
cut + paste

http://www.magicgardenseeds.com/seite?wg=99&id=AHgwxQGR

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