Go Italian for a New Outlook on Zucchinis

August 7, 2007

Tired of that same old, same old, when it comes to growing summer squash in the backyard vegetable garden?

Would you like to ambush and surprise your friends before they realize what’s about to hit them as you approach bearing armloads of surplus zucchinis?

A New Take on a Popular Garden Vegetable

zucchini squash.thumbnail Go Italian for a New Outlook on ZucchinisIf so then one of the gourmet Italian or Mediterranean squash varieties may be just what you’re looking for. These summer squashes offer the familiar zucchini shapes and sizes in different shades and subtle, new flavors.

Magda is a Mediterranean type zucchini, while Lungo Bianco di Sicilia (Long White from Sicily) is an Italian variety that is growing in my garden this summer. You can’t go wrong with either for a pleasant change from the traditional dark green zucchini squashes.

Despite its name Lungo Bianco is not white but rather a very light green squash with splotches and slightly ribbed. The large plants are good producers that will continue to bear fruits if you harvest on a regular basis.

Growing Italian and Mediterranean Summer Squashes

These zucchinis are planted, grown, and harvested no differently that the ordinary varities that show up everywhere during this stage of the summer growing season. No special handling is required for these beauties!

They can also be I prepared in any of your favorite zucchini recipes from stuffed or steamed squash, to ratatouille or zucchini bread. I think Magda and Lungo Bianco di Sicilia taste better than your everyday zucchinis but it could just be my enthusiasm over growing an unusual variety.

italian zucchini plant.thumbnail Go Italian for a New Outlook on ZucchinisSo if you like zucchinis but want to try something a little different check out one of these imported gourmet squashes in your own backyard garden.





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{ 7 comments… read them below or add one }

Marc @ GardenDesk August 8, 2007 at 5:01 pm

I love zucchini when it is picked small. Our zucchini is just the boring green kind. I want to try the Lungo Bianco di Sicilia. Can you find the seeds at the normal seed companies or only at a specialty site? Have you noticed any different insect or disease tendency with it, or does it have the same resistance as traditional varieties?

Thanks for sharing this.

Kenny Point August 8, 2007 at 8:09 pm

Hey Marc, I prefer harvesting the zucchinis when younger and tender also, unless I plan to stuff them or use in soups. No you probably won’t find Lungo Bianco for sale at a local seed distributor. I purchased my seeds from “Seeds From Italy,” which offers a large selection of imported gourmet vegetable seeds. I haven’t noticed any problems or increased incidence of disease when growing these zucchini varieties. Also, I haven’t seen a single squash bug on these zucchinis this year, but I think that is because I waited until later in the season to plant my summer squash out into the garden.

Ken Schutt February 23, 2008 at 7:01 pm

I bought a plant from a local nursery two years ago, but have not found one since. I want to plant another this year. It was either a Lungo Bianco or a Bianco. Where can I find either a plant or seeds for it?
Ken

Kenny Point February 24, 2008 at 8:03 am

Try Seeds from Italy at the link in comment #2 above.

Mallo2011 February 15, 2011 at 3:12 pm

Hi from Italy,
here is my suggestion for a very peculiar italian zucchini:
Tondo di Piacenza. An early courgette which is almost perfectly spherical. Most of the round courgettes available are very pale , but these are a nice glossy dark green colour. Definitely worth a try if you fancy something a little bit different.
Hope you like,
Mallo2011

Jennifer August 31, 2011 at 7:18 pm

Hi from Eastern Canada,
Here is a question about zucchinis? I bought six transplants of green zucchini and they all grew wonderful but in the six transplants one plant is producing white or albino zucchini. All plants look exactly the same. So how can I tell if the white one is a white one or an albino of the green? Or are they the same thing. If it is a white italian or a bianco what do I do with it. I am in Eastern Canada if that makes a difference I don’t know.
Thanks

Kenny Point September 2, 2011 at 9:29 am

Hi Jennifer, it could just be an off variety or from a seed that was crossed with something… it would be perfectly fine to use and eat as normal.

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