Early Jersey Wakefield Cabbage

January 30, 2006

Early Jersey Wakefield Cabbage is one of my favorite varieties of green cabbage and the one that I choose most often for early spring plantings.

One thing that sets this heirloom cabbage apart from other common varieties is that Early Jersey Wakefield produces heads with a distinctly pointed, conical shape. To top it off this is a very delicious vegetable, regarded by many as one of the best tasting cabbages.

The small two to three pound heads grow quickly and will be ready for harvesting at the beginning of summer, making Early Jersey Wakefield a great choice for succession growing. Simply sow late summer crops in the same space vacated by the harvested cabbages.

The compact size is ideal for the raised bed gardener. You can easily space four or five of these cabbages closely across the width of an average sized raised bed without over crowding.

In the kitchen this sweet, tender cabbage is perfect for chopping and using raw as an addition to tossed green salads. Early Jersey Wakefield can also be cooked just as you would prepare any of your favorite cabbage recipes.

This vegetable is subject to attack from the usual cabbage pests most notably the common cabbage worm. Planting during early spring may enable you to grow and harvest your crop before the cabbage butterflies become more active during late summer. Otherwise handpick the worms or apply Bacillus Thuringlensis for organic control of these pests.

Early Jersey Wakefield cabbage is ready for harvesting about two months after transplanting. They will hold in the garden for two or three weeks after they mature, but if left standing in the garden too long the heads will begin to split.

Other similar cabbage varieties include Greyhound and the larger sized Charleston Wakefield. So if you’re seeking a great cabbage for home garden production try Early Jersey Wakefield. I think you’ll be pleased with the convenience and flavor of this prized heirloom cabbage.





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{ 1 comment… read it below or add one }

gin maxwell June 2, 2009 at 10:25 am

What a beauty—the Early Jersey Wakefield. Thanks for good info as this is my first try at raising cabbage.

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