Seed Starting Techniques

It’s been pretty raw outside for the past week but despite the wet and chilly conditions it’s an ideal time to get out and take care of a few transplanting tasks in the vegetable garden. Sure, it’s not the most agreeable time for an organic gardener to be outdoors, but it is perfect weather for setting out hardy veggie transplants, relocating over wintered crops, or thinning direct seeded plants to give them additional space to grow and mature.

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Well the Tasteful Garden offers a convenient option for beginner gardeners, growers that are short on time for seed starting, and for gardeners who don’t want to start their own vegetable transplants from seed but still want to choose from a good assortment of healthy and productive fruit, veggie and herb plants.

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It’s Time to Start Your Seeds! That was the subject line of an email that screamed out at me a few weeks ago. This alert that it was time to “start your seeds” arrived during the middle of January and was delivered to me in the cold and snow covered state of Pennsylvania!

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After planting about fifty tomato seeds that were given the opportunity to germinate, grow, and compete in my annual tomato seedling competition, I’m now down to twelve strong and healthy tomato plants that have earned their spots out in the garden. I selected a dozen interesting tomato varieties, most of them heirlooms, to grow from seed this season. It wasn’t easy to choose among the candidates as there are hundreds of unique heirlooms to select from.

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Seed Starting Woes

April 22, 2007

Sometimes you do all the right things to start your own seeds indoors; from using the best seed starting supplies, to providing the finest care for your seedlings, and somehow things still go awry and you find yourself facing seed starting problems. Today I’m going to wrap up this series of posts on seed starting techniques by providing some trouble shooting ideas for what to do when good seeds go bad… really bad!

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The previous entry in this series on raising vegetable transplants examined the seed starting supplies and equipment required to germinate seedlings indoors. Today we’ll look at all the steps involved in growing your own transplants from seed.

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Seed Starting Essentials

April 19, 2007

Now that you’ve embraced the benefits of seed starting and are ready to grow your own vegetable transplants, let’s take inventory of the seed starting supplies and equipment that will be required.

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Seed Starting

April 18, 2007

This week I’ll be posting a short series of articles detailing seed starting tips to help you plant and grow your own vegetable, flower, and herb seedlings to transplant out into the garden. What’s the big deal about starting your own seedlings? Well read on for some of the benefits to be gained.

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You’ve nurtured those vegetable plants from seed and taken the effort to carefully harden off your transplants. Now make sure that you employ the best transplanting techniques to get your vegetable seedlings into the garden with as little disruption in their growth as possible.

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